Faculty

Header Logo





Ingersoll Brooke Ingersoll
Associate Professor
Ph.D. Psychology - University of California, San Diego 2003
Masters Psychology - University of California, San Diego 1999
Bachelors Psychology and French - University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 1996
Primary Program: Clinical
105B Psychology
(517) 432-8412
ingers19@msu.edu


Research Statement
|

Dr. Ingersoll’s research focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of social communication interventions for individuals with autism.  She also conducts research on the impact of ASD on the family and the broader autism phenotype.  A major emphasis of her current work is on the development of community-focused, parent-mediated interventions for young children with ASD.  



Related Research Websites
 description
The Autism Lab In typical development, social-communication skills emerge in a predictable pattern, with nonverbal skills, such as imitation and joint attention, preceding language development and theory of mind. In autism, these early, non-verbal social-communication skills are significantly impaired. Children with autism also experience delayed or deviant language and social-emotional development. We are interested in understanding the role that early non-verbal, social-communication deficits play in development of later emerging language and social impairments.


Research Publications    
  Title 
2012Ingersoll, B., Walton, K., Bonter, N., & Jelinek, S. (2012). A comparison of naturalistic behavioral and developmental, social-pragmatic interventions on language use and social engagement in children with autism. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 55, 1301-1313.
2012Ingersoll, B. (2012). Brief Report: Effect of a focused imitation intervention on social functioning in children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42, 1768-1773.
2012Walton, K. & Ingersoll, B. (2012). Evaluation of a sibling-mediated imitation intervention for young children with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 14, 241-253.
2011Ingersoll, B., Meyer, K., & Becker, M. (2011). Short Report: Increased rates of depressed mood in mothers of children with ASD associated with the presence of the broader autism phenotype. Autism Research, 4, 143-148.
2011Ingersoll, B. & Hambrick, D. Z. (2011). The relationship between the broader autism phenotype, child severity, and stress and depression in parents of children with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 5, 337-344.
2011Ingersoll, B., Hopwood, C. J., Wainer, A., & Donnellan, M.B. (2011). A comparison of three self-report measures of the broader autism phenotype in a non-clinical sample. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorder, 41, 1646-1657.
2011Ingersoll, B. & Meyer, K. (2011). Examination of correlates of different imitative functions in young children with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 5, 1078-1085.
2011Ingersoll, B. & Meyer, K. (2011). Do object and gesture imitation skills represent independent dimensions in autism? Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, 23, 421-431.
2011Wainer, A., Ingersoll, B., & Hopwood, C. J. (2011). The structure and nature of the broader autism phenotype in a non-clinical sample. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 33, 459-469.
2011Ingersoll, B. (2011). The differential effect of three naturalistic language interventions on language use in children with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 13, 109-118.