Faculty

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Klump Kelly Klump
Professor
Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Clinical Psychology 1998
Masters University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Clinical Psychology 1996
Bachelors Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 1993
Primary Program: Clinical
107B Psychology
(517) 432-7281
klump@msu.edu


Research Statement
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The Klump lab studies the etiology of eating disorders with an emphasis on genetic and neurobiological risk factors. Dr. Klump is particularly interested in understanding developmental differences in these risk factors across adolescence and adulthood, with a particular emphasis on the role of gonadal hormones and comorbid traits (e.g., personality traits) and disorders (e.g., mood and anxiety disorders).  She approaches these research questions using a translational scientific framework that includes both human and animal models of eating disorder development.  



Related Research Websites
 description
Michigan State University Twin Registry In sum, the MSUTR research will allow for better understanding of the environmental, genetic and neurobiological factors that influence psychological functioning and behavior. Our research will aid in the identification of the origins of internalizing and externalizing symptoms, ultimately informing treatment and prevention efforts.


Research Publications    
  Title 
2014Racine, S.E., Culbert, K.M., Burt, S.A., & Klump, K.L. (2014). Advanced paternal age at birth: Phenotypic and etiologic associations with eating disorder risk in offspring. Psychological Medicine, 44(5), 1029-1041.
2014Klump, K.L., Racine, S.E., Hildebrandt, B., Burt, S.A., Neale, M., Sisk, C.L., Boker, S., & Keel, P.K. (2014). Ovarian hormone influences on dysregulated eating: A comparison of associations between women with versus without binge episodes. Clinical Psychological Science, 2(5), 545-559.
2013Racine, S.A., Keel, P.K., Burt, S.A., Sisk, C.L., Neale, M., Boker, S., & Klump, K.L. (2013). Exploring the relationship between negative urgency and dysregulated eating: Etiologic associations and the role of negative affect. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 122(2), 433-444.
2013Klump, K.L., Keel, P.K., Racine, S.E., Burt, S.A., Sisk, C.L., Neale, M., Boker, S., & Hu, J.Y. (2013). The interactive effects of estrogen and progesterone on changes in emotional eating across the menstrual cycle. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 122(1), 131-137.
2013Culbert, K.M., Breedlove, S.M., Nigg, J.T., Sisk, C.L., Burt, S.A., & Klump, K.L. (2013). The emergence of sex differences in risk for disordered eating attitudes during puberty: A role for prenatal testosterone exposure. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 122(2), 420-432.
2013Klump, K.L., Keel, P.K., Burt, S.A., Racine, S.E., Neale, M.C., Sisk, C.L., & Boker, S. (2013). Ovarian hormones and emotional eating across the menstrual cycle: An examination of the potential moderating effects of body mass index and dietary restraint. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 46(3), 256-263.
2013Klump, K.L., Racine, S.E., Hildebrandt, B., & Sisk, C.L. (2013). Sex differences in binge eating proneness in male and female rats. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 46(7), 729-736.
2013Klump, K.L. (2013). Puberty as a critical risk period for eating disorders: A review of human and animal studies. Hormones and Behavior, 64, 399-410.
2012Racine, S.E., Culbert, K.M., Keel, P.K., Sisk, C.L., Burt, S.A., & Klump, K.L. (2012). Differential associations between ovarian hormones and disordered eating symptoms across the menstrual cycle in women. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 45(3), 333-344.
2012Klump, K.L., Culbert, K.M., Slane, J.D., Burt, S.A., Sisk, C.L., & Nigg, J.T. (2012). The effects of puberty on genetic risk for disordered eating: Evidence for a sex difference. Psychological Medicine, 42(3), 627-638.